Effect of Age on Blood Rheology in Sickle Cell Anaemia and Sickle Cell Haemoglobin C Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study

Abstract : OBJECTIVES: Blood rheology plays a key role in the pathophysiology of sickle cell anaemia (SS) and sickle cell haemoglobin C disease (SC), but its evolution over the lifespan is unknown. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Blood viscosity, red blood cell (RBC) deformability and aggregation, foetal haemoglobin (HbF) and haematocrit were measured in 114 healthy individuals (AA), 267 SS (161 children + 106 adults) and 138 SC (74 children + 64 adults) patients. RESULTS: Our results showed that 1) RBC deformability is at its maximal value during the early years of life in SS and SC populations, mainly because HbF level is also at its peak, 2) during childhood and adulthood, hydroxycarbamide treatment, HbF level and gender modulated RBC deformability in SS patients, independently of age, 3) blood viscosity is higher in older SS and SC patients compared to younger ones and 4) haematocrit decreases as SS patients age. CONCLUSION: The hemorheological changes detected in older patients could play a role in the progressive development of several chronic disorders in sickle cell disease, whose prevalence increases with age. Retarding these age-related haemorheological impairments, by using suitable drugs, may minimize the risks of vaso-occlusive events and chronic disorders.
Type de document :
Article dans une revue
PLoS ONE, Public Library of Science, 2016, 11 (6), pp.e0158182. 〈10.1371/journal.pone.0158182〉
Liste complète des métadonnées

https://hal.univ-antilles.fr/hal-01669747
Contributeur : Marc Romana <>
Soumis le : jeudi 21 décembre 2017 - 00:21:58
Dernière modification le : mercredi 18 juillet 2018 - 20:11:27

Licence


Distributed under a Creative Commons Paternité 4.0 International License

Lien texte intégral

Identifiants

Citation

Céline Renoux, Marc Romana, Philippe Joly, Séverine Ferdinand, Camille Faes, et al.. Effect of Age on Blood Rheology in Sickle Cell Anaemia and Sickle Cell Haemoglobin C Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study. PLoS ONE, Public Library of Science, 2016, 11 (6), pp.e0158182. 〈10.1371/journal.pone.0158182〉. 〈hal-01669747〉

Partager

Métriques

Consultations de la notice

163